WELCOME to CWC's Youth Wildlife Rescue Blog

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CWC's Youth Wildlife Rescue Blog invites young people to have fun and get involved with the work of California Wildlife Center whose mission is to rescue, rehabilitate, and release injured, abandoned or sick native wildlife and marine mammals from the greater Los Angeles area. Come and get involved yourself or with your school and help our local wildlife. The Wildlife Center has taken in 19,000+ wild animals since its opening in 1998 and relies solely on public donations and grants. CWC is located in a quiet part of the Santa Monica mountains in Calabasas. Please visit our website at www.californiawildlifecenter.org for more information. We look forward to hearing from you on this blog!


We have a brand new website! Check it out! www.cawildlife.org It's awesome!!!

Check out some of our Fall rescues and patients!

Our Grey squirrels are finally rehabbed! See there release below!

Check out Charlie, the elephant seal pups rescue and release back into the wild!

Thank all of you who attended our 13th Annual Wild Brunch fundraiser in September at Gulls Way Estate in Malibu! It was a huge success because of you!

Check out our first, ever Big Free-tailed bat!

Our November 2010 Coyote rehab and release video is finally done. Check it out in our new posts section below. The video of our 5 rehabbed fawns is also up.

Thank you to everyone that turned out for our Wild Brunch on August 22nd. It was a smashing success! Check out Mike Hayward's photos of the event.

Thanks to everyone that came and took a Walk on the Wild Side, May 2nd...You can check out the photos at:Mike Hayward's Special Events Photography.

An awesome time was had by all at our Spring Open House.

News briefs: See a pelican get rescued! We're having a Pelican party in our ICU...first black-coat elephant seal ever rescued by CWC...First marine mammal rescue in SoCal for 2010...Yearling sea lion rescued at Pt. Dume! Update on our rescued fox from Culver City! We have another Youth Rescue blog hero! .DON'T TRIM THAT TREE - baby birds and squirrels are nesting now! Watch the CBS report here...HAVE FUN! HELP THE ANIMALS! EARN COMMUNITY SERVICE CREDITS! Organize a fund-raising event at your school! Contact our youth team with your good (even crazy!) ideas at rescuecwc@california wildlife center.org...

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

The Easter eggs that hatched!

These little Easter ducklings were brought in to the Center, and are being taken care of until they grow big enough to be returned to the wild. Bet you can't tell how many there are!
These are Mallards, whose numbers are decreasing, although you wouldn't know it from looking at this picture! When they grow up the males will have gorgeous glossy green heads and necks, while the females will be brown and keep the very smart stripe you see on each side of these ducklings heads. Mallards mate for life, and pairs form in the fall, well before breeding season in Spring. The female makes a shallow nest of leaves or grass, and lays 8 - 10 eggs. Once they hatch, the ducklings are ready to go out of the nest after just one day, and the Mom will lead her ducklings straight to the nearest water where they are the most safe. Sometimes this can be a swimming pool. I know because I have a Mom and 10 ducklings on mine right now!

A Giant Easter Surprise!

Our marine mammal rescue team got a call on Easter Sunday about a sea lion stranded on the beach in Pirates Cove. We went to check it out. We found an adult male sea lion approximately 8-10 feet in length and anywhere from 400 - 475 lbs. A true Giant! He was assessed for injuries and none were found. He had just come out of the water for a nice nap on a very beautiful day. Sea lions and seals come up on the beach to rest and warm up. If you ever encounter one, please do not disturb it or approach it. They will bite to defend themselves and they can move very quickly on land. It is perfectly normal for them to be out of the water. The best thing to do is call our Marine Mammal Hotline at 310-458-WILD. We will come out and assess the animal to make sure it is not injured, sick, or abandoned. If it needs to be rescued, we will rescue it. It will then be transported to the Marine Mammal Care Center in San Pedro for care and eventually, released back into the wild!

Friday, April 3, 2009

This nestling great horned owl was brought to our Center from Saugus. It apparently had fallen out of the nest. Great horned owls show a marked preference for nesting in the crowns of large pine trees, sometimes taking over abandoned nests that were built by crows, squirrels, or hawks. Since the owls do little or nothing to improve the nests, it's quite common for the nest to disintegrate, especially as the young put on weight and begin to move around. He appears to be about one month old and is eating very well, which will speed his recuperation time and ready him for his eventual return to the wilds of Saugus. Stay tuned for a future release date!